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Save the Rhino Trust - Namibia
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Mike Hearn
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Save the Rhino Trust - Namibia
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Save the Rhino Trust Namibia - Funds from the cycle Ride will go to continue
http://www.rhino-trust.org.na

Save the Rhino Trust, is an indigenous Namibian NGO (known as SRT). It was set up in 1982 by Blythe Loutit, who was sickened by the appalling in slaughter she witnessed in N W Namibia. Poaching reduced numbers to just 50 animals in the 1980s. Since then SRT has stopped the slaughter and succeeded in more than doubling numbers as well as increasing the geographical area of the rhino range. Mike Hearn joined SRT in 1993.


SRT is protecting some rather special rhinos: The Desert Adapted Rhino, a rare subspecies of the black rhino (Diceros Bicornis Bicornis), is uniquely adapted to the desert. The Landscape is so rough that Camels, inherited from Benedict Allen, are used to penetrate areas where vehicle access is impossible.


Living on Tribal Land

The Desert Rhino roams a vast area, 20,000 km2 : This land is communally owned by the Damara Herero and Himba Tribes, whom SRT employ as rhino monitors. SRT's role in training and education has successfully brought about a change in attitude. Communities now view the rhinos as their heritage, an investment for their own future.

It is the only sizable population of black rhinos in the world existing outside National Park or protected area with no ranger support except SRT.


A tough Life in the Desert:

The Desert rhino has to travel vast distances in the heat simply to find enough food for survival. They have vast home ranges (From 28 km2 up to 790 km2) often as much as 20 times the size of other black rhino home ranges (eg Kenya home ranges are from 3 km2 to 45 km).

The climate also restricts population growth as survival is so tough (it is just a 1/3 of other black rhinos. Calves can die of heat exhaustion if disturbed by humans or predators.

SRT Namibia is supported by the UK Charities:

David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation, Save the Rhino International and Tusk Trust